Prom Queen, Most Likely to Succeed, Most Talkative: They were in high school when painkillers hit their small Ohio town two decades ago. Today, their yearbook reflects the devastating toll of the opioid crisis.

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Replies
  • Nearly 50 members of Minford High School's Class of 2000 shared with @globaldan how opioids have impacted their lives, families and community. Their stories shed new light on the epidemic's rise and spread over a generation. https://nyti.ms/2qaCM1e 

    Nearly 50 members of Minford High School's Class of 2000 shared with @globaldan how opioids have impacted their lives, families and community. Their stories shed new light on the epidemic's rise and spread over a generation. https://nyti.ms/2qaCM1e 

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  • Minford's Class of 2000 started high school the year Purdue Pharma introduced OxyContin. By their senior year, painkillers were everywhere, in classrooms, school bathrooms, parties: "I told myself I was never going to do them. But kids were selling Oxys at school for $3 a pill."

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  • For many students, experimenting with pills rapidly morphed into addiction before they were even old enough to vote. A decade after the class graduated, their county was ground zero in Ohio's opioid crisis: "Every single person in our group of friends got addicted.”

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  • The opioid epidemic is personal to Minford's Class of 2000: 3 classmates died from drug use, at least 15 have struggled with addiction and nearly 75% of those we interviewed have family members who are addicted or in recovery.

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  • Read more about the experiences of the Minford Class of 2000 and how @globaldan reported their stories

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  • Replying to @nytimes

    This sounds like a bunch of bs. I’d like to see the statistics. Graduated 2 years later not too far from here and our community was nothing like this.

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  • Replying to @TheMacyMarie @nytimes

    Lol south central LA is 15 miles from Bel Air. I bet those high school students live different lives as well lol 😂🤣😂🤣😂

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  • Replying to @nytimes

    If only this type of empathy was shown during the crack epidemic!

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  • Replying to @ShugsWife23 @nytimes

    It's all fun and games until it's white people who are hurting. Now it's a problem

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  • Replying to @nytimes

    Choices matter. Many times, people have a hard time empathizing on the idea of addiction being an illness, bc it is an illness that began as a personal choice. (Not referring here to those with devastating injuries who began taking medication out of necessity)

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  • Replying to @AMRoffgr1d @nytimes

    Purdue Pharma chose to flood these communities with opioids knowing full well what would happen. And now nobody is making them pay for it

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